BTS: Cate Blanchett – Fashion Shibari (Free Preview of BTS)

On June 16, 2013, one of the most acclaimed actresses and fashion icons of her generation, Cate Blanchette, was featured in a shibari photo shoot in the Spring/Summer 2013 issue of 032c Magazine (#24).  The photography was done by Sean & Seng. I don’t know who the rigger was.  I have reached out to Sean+Seng on IG, but have not yet heard back.

Blue found these original pictures on The Citizens of Fashion.

We LOVE seeing more and more artists embracing the edgy fashion and themes of shibari.  This moves rope more and more into the public consciousness, helping to normalize it.  This is good for us.

Below is a high-level breakdown of what was done and links to tutorials teaching the skills required to create a scene like this.  Enjoy!

Original is below
Source: 032c Magazine (#24)
Model: Cate Blanchette
Rigger: Currently Unknown
Photographer: Sean & Seng

BTS - Cate Blanchett - Annotated

There are likely 4 pieces of 30′ (9m) for the harness and one for the upline.  I think this may have been tied with 5mm rope, instead of the 6mm that I use.  I base this on Ms. Blanchette’s build – she is ~ 5’8” (174cm) and slight of build – and the fact that there are quite a number of wraps that do not cover much area.  But that, just like everything else on this page, is only an educated guess.  I have not collaborated or confirmed with the rigger or photographers.

  1. The primary harness begins with what appears to be a Lark’s Head Single Column or Square Knot Single Column
  2. It then used the tail to continue into a 2-rope Gote Shibari (aka Takate Kote, commonly called a “TK”) …
  3. …with the classic kannuki technique applied to each band as it was created.
  4. When it comes to adding more rope, converting the 2TK into a 3TK, they use a variation of the Y-Harness (Y-3TK) pattern…
  5. …but they interweave the tail between wraps of the upper chest band as they go.
  6. This first, inner, Y only captures the band just below the breasts before
  7. adding another rope and heading back to the back.
  8. Here they add yet one more horizontal band nearer the waist. This will help support the harness from migrating upwards when they add the upline.
  9. Then use the tail to make the outer wrap of the Y-Harness.
  10. As they do, they weave it into the upper chest band, opposite of the inner Y.
  11. The go around the inner Y and then under the middle chest band
  12. Then go down to catch the lower chest/waist band.
  13. On the way back up, they wrap the tail around the existing vertical lines a bit…
  14. …then complete the Y…
  15. …and use up the rest of the rope on the back.

Anchoring the tie to the tree

  1. Using a new rope, they connect to upper two bands of the TK using a 2-Point (“Y”) Hanger. They lock the hanger with rope. This is commonly done the same way you would lock a Somerville Bowline.
  2. They then run the rope up around the tree branch, adjust how high they want the rope to lift (not too high as she is just being anchored to the tree, not actually suspended), then run the tail back down under the hanger and back up around the branch.
  3. Then lock off using an incomplete form of the Bamboo Friction
  4. … wrapping the remaining tail around the up lines instead of using the technique shown in the Bamboo Friction tutorial. (I would strongly recommend you use the complete version of the Bamboo Friction in place of 19 and 19; it will have a stronger, more reliable grip)
  5. Bonus! Remember to use a good box tie position.  She is not doing so in this picture, but the position she has adopted looks super cool!  Sometimes you make choices for their artistic merit.
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1 Comment

  1. Love the pictures and your breakdown

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